What Is the Difference Between a Job, an Occupation and a Career?

Often the terms “job”, “occupation”, and “career” are used interchangeably. However, in actual fact, these terms have quite different meanings so it is important to distinguish between these terms.

A “job”is work for which you receive pay. It is therefore a means to live and may or may not be long-term or lead to anything else by way of work. For this reason a job can be seen as one large task or a series of tasks that is typically performed in return for money. Contract work and project work often contain “jobs” that have to be done, usually on a fixed-term basis (even if they are repeated over many months and even years). Individuals tend to talk about their work as “just a job” when it doesn’t give them much long-term career satisfaction.

An “occupation” is a wide category of jobs with similar characteristics. In other words, an occupation is a broad title for what someone does on a continual basis. This means that all of their work tends to fit into a professional category that most people recognize. There are many examples in this category but some might be an accountant, doctor, engineer, nurse, plumber, police officer, scientist or teacher. As you can see, most occupations are fairly well-understood in concept, if not specific terms, and there is therefore lots of good information to be gathered on them (online, for example) as a future career option. Job satisfaction is often greater in an occupational role, but in modern times, it is far less likely than it used to be that people stay in only one occupation. Today, many of us will change occupations several times in our lives.

Finally, a “career” is a lifetime journey of building and making good use of your skills, knowledge and experiences (wherever these are invested). Put another way, a career is a period of long-term employment usually in a given area or industry. An individual will therefore typically spend many years in an area or industry and perform what may be several different roles. A career is consequently similar to an occupation but is often much broader, as it may involve several linked occupational jobs in the same or similar fields. For example, a doctor might start as a resident at a hospital, become a surgeon, act as a specialist, become a medical director and finally become a hospital administrator. These are four very directly linked occupations but can be considered a career in the medical field.

Of course, in a more general sense, there is nothing stopping individuals from pursuing quite a varied career in which he or she starts as an accountant for instance, works his or her way up to a Chief Financial Officer, later becoming a Chief Executive. S/he may even end his or her career on the board of an entirely different company in an unfamiliar field — still very much a career!

So in summary, a job is work for which you receive pay, an occupation is a range of jobs with similar characteristics and finally a career is a lifetime of making good use of your skills, knowledge and experiences.

Why does it matter?

If you simply want a job, you may be happy to collect your money as a return for the hours you put in and not worry that much about where it may lead you in the future. Both younger and older employees often feel that this is entirely acceptable, as they either want to gain some experience for their résumé or have to earn money to fund their out-of-work activities or interests. However, as soon as you start to think about other issues such as greater job interest, growth, learning and development, and collaboration opportunities, you are starting to think in more occupational terms (a field of activity in which you might flourish) and career terms (where one job may well lead to another that you may enjoy even more). For this reason, we will be examining how to look at occupations and careers that provide the greatest potential for enjoyment for individuals. And in order to do this we first have to know quite a lot about ourselves.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Baby Boomers Over Age of 50 Pushed Out of Jobs

New data released last month was disturbing for the 85% of baby boomers still working. Many don’t have enough saved for retirement or simply aren’t ready to leave the working world behind. Some say they plan to continue working into their 70’s and even 80s, according to a 2017 report, America’s Aging Workforce.

Unfortunately, new analysis by ProPublica and the Urban Institute published last month shows that the decision may not be up to them. Dismally, more than half of employees over the age of 50 are being pushed out of longtime jobs before they choose to retire. Most suffer financially and only one in 10 of these workers ever earns as much as they did before their employment setbacks.

Apparently, 50 is the new 65.

The analysis was based on data from the Health and Retirement Study that began tracking 20,000 people in 1992, from the time the participants turned 50 through the rest of their lives. The study focused on workers who entered their 50s with stable, full-time jobs, and who have been with the same employer for at least five years.

The results are sobering. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are currently 40 million Americans age 50 and older who are working. That means, according to this study, that as many as 22 million of these people have or will suffer a layoff, forced retirement, or other involuntary job separation. Of these, only a little over 2 million have recovered financially – or ever will.

Unfortunately, this problem could be worse than we think. Jeffrey Wenger, a senior labor economist with the RAND Corp., claims some older people are likely laid off, but cover it up by saying they retired. “There’s so much social stigma around being separated from work,” he says, “even people who are fired or let go will say they retired to save face.”

As a result, the steady earnings that many boomers count on in their 50s, 60s, and beyond to build up their retirement savings and ensure financial security often disappears.

“This isn’t how most people think they’re going to finish out their work lives,” said Richard Johnson, an Urban Institute economist and veteran scholar of the older labor force who worked on the analysis. “For the majority of older Americans, working after 50 is considerably riskier and more turbulent than we previously thought.”

What can older workers do?

You may be thinking, wait a minute. Isn’t it illegal under the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act for employers to treat older workers differently than younger ones? Yes, but employers can be sneaky about the way they fire older employees, Often phrases like “layoff” and “job elimination” are used as an excuse for age discrimination. No matter. You may have legal recourse and an age discrimination claim if:

– you experience a layoff and notice that less-qualified, younger employees at the

same level are not being laid off.

– your company claims to be eliminating a job, but simply changes the title and puts

someone younger in the same position.

– you’re being targeted for poor performance while younger employees doing the

same things aren’t suffering any consequences.

In addition, there are some steps you can take to prevent being laid off. Although there are no guarantees, experts recommend the following strategies to enhance job security:

* A common myth concerning older workers is that people over 50 are rigid. You can prove this disparaging idea wrong by remaining flexible, resilient, and adaptable.

* Understand your company’s objectives and your boss’s priorities, and then align your work performance with them. In other words, find ways to make your boss’s job easier and make yourself indispensable.

* Do not contribute to the false belief that all old people are cranky and difficult. Be friendly, cooperative, and helpful. Makes sure management likes you and be the kind of person others enjoy working with and hanging around.

* Brag a little. Ensure that your boss knows about any improvements you’ve implemented, challenges you’ve overcome, and projects and goals you’ve completely successfully.

* Be careful not to give the impression that you lack initiative and are simply coasting along until retirement, which can make you vulnerable during a layoff. Make a point of continuously updating your skills and expanding your knowledge. Read journals, take courses, attend conferences, or attain additional certifications in your field.

Finally, while it’s important for everyone to have emergency savings, if you’re 50 or older, it’s even more critical to have a strong financial safety net. Have enough savings on hand to ride out a potentially lengthy period of unemployment.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Good And Bad About Online Data Entry Jobs

There are many sought-after positions on the Internet but none of them as popular as online data entry jobs. The reason they are so popular is that mothers can make extra money without leaving home. Other men and women decide to work from home full-time for companies that will information research and then uploaded.

However, people should always be on the lookout for frauds. There many of them and the bait and switch routine is the most popular. The offering may look very legitimate in the beginning. It is not until after a person pays money will discover more money will be required. For instance, they may have to promote a product, sell that product, before they receive any pay. Furthermore, if they get a refund there will be a charge back.

This can frustrate a lot of honest people. They earnestly seek for a job only to get deceptive practices and exaggerations of the truth. A person should be cautious about any offering that requires money be paid first. There will be a good likelihood the company is hiding something. Always make sure research the offer and the company. There several good reviews sites that do in-depth analysis and show the results.

Also, if a website uses phrases like, our system is guaranteed, and this should be a warning. Phrases like that are a giveaway that the company is not offer a service but selling a product instead. Hundreds of people discover this is a fraud after they waste their money.

However, this should not discourage people from looking for legitimate work at home positions. They will not get rich but they will make extra money. The key is to deal directly with the business. Avoid using an intermediate company that makes false promises. A real opportunity will train a person and value that person’s skills without first charging money.

Additionally, do not accept free software if the website promises they will provide software for the job. Many of these free software offers are poorly written programs. Some of them will compromise the computer. In addition, be concerned about websites that want to exchange information for an e-mail address. Chances are all they want is e-mail. At best, a person will get a book is poorly written with generalized Information.

Discovering good jobs to work and home is going to be similar to locating any other kind of job. Find a company that needs your skills and then apply. In the beginning, the work will be slow until reliability incompetency is demonstrated. So expect only a little bit of work. As necessary skills become demonstrated, the company will offer the person more jobs. Having several companies can equal full-time employment.

In conclusion, it is great to work at home. This thing to remember is to investigate the opportunity first. This is to avoid jumping into a scam. Finding worth from home is like discovering any other regular job. The business will require an application and some references. However, they will provide all the necessary tools and software as well as train a person. The best place to begin looking at on line data entry jobs is on the Internet.

Copyright (c) 2011 Jayden Harris

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Teens, Jobs and School: The Pros and Cons

Most teens realize at a fairly young age the old adage that “money equals power.” Money equals designer clothes, a car and insurance, and in many cases, a certain amount of freedom. And in order to get money, many teens get part-time jobs.

While the benefits and/or drawbacks of teens and part-time jobs have been researched, studied and debated since at least 1979, the teens, jobs and affects on schoolwork verdict is still out. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 50 percent of American teenagers hold informal jobs, such as babysitting or yard work, by age 12. And by age 15, nearly two-thirds of American teens have had some kind of employment. And many researchers, including those on government panels like the National Commission on Youth praise part-time work and say it contributes to the transition from youth to adulthood.

Parents and educators alike have, for decades, said that part-time jobs teach children how to be responsible and manage money. But Temple University researcher Laurence Steinberg found that only 11 percent of students report saving most of their money for college, and only three percent contribute to household living expenses. “The bulk of teen’s money goes to clothing, cars, entertainment, and in some cases, drugs and alcohol,” according to results of a study published in Harvard Education Letter in 1998.

Steinberg says, “Students who work longer hours report diminished engagement in schooling, lowered school performance, increased psychological distress, higher drug and alcohol use, higher rates of delinquency and greater autonomy from parental control.” A 1997 study by David Stern, director of the National Research Center for Vocational Education at the University of California, Berkeley, proves Steinberg’s viewpoint. In research conducted over 20 years, students who worked more than 15 hours per week had lower grades, did less homework, had higher dropout rates and were less likely to go to college than students who worked under 15 hours per week.

But Jerald Bachman at the University of Michigan’s Monitoring the Future Project, warns not to jump to cause and effect conclusions. “I would argue that most of the problems that correlate with working long hours are more fundamentally caused,” he says. “That may contribute the to spiral, but I think the spiral is well underway at the time they elect to work the long hours.”

Though the drawbacks to a busy, part-time job are many, so are the benefits. A teenager’s job can teach work skills that school does not, and it can instill in the teen new confidence, sense of responsibility and independence. Earning money will enable your teen to buy things and to manage money. An after-school job can also provide adult supervision, especially if you work longer hours than those in a typical school day. And the right job may provide networking possibilities and set your child on a rewarding lifetime career path.

But before your child gets a job, there are some things you should know. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, “Minors under 14 years of age may not be employed or permitted to work in any occupation, except children employed on farms or in domestic service in private homes.” Children under the age of 14 can also work on farms, be golf caddies, newspaper carriers or juvenile performers in the entertainment industry. But special permits may need to be required.

Also according to many state labor laws, teens aged 14 and 15 are not permitted to work more than four hours per day during the school year and not before 7 a.m. or after 7 p.m. (During the summer, the amount of hours of work per day can be increased to eight.) Children under the age of 16 are prohibited, by Pennsylvania law, for example, from working in bowling centers (unless as snack bar attendants, scorers or control desk clerks), building heavy work, highway work, anywhere liquor is sold or dispensed, manufacturing, on scaffolds or ladders and window cleaning.

For 16 and 17 year olds, the some state laws say, “minors are not to work before 6 a.m. or after midnight on school days and 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.” Also, not more than eight hours per day and 28 hours per school week. (During the summer, the only restrictions on 16 and 17 year olds, is that they can work no more than eight hours per day or 44 hours per week.) Young adults under the age of 18 are prohibited from working in billiard rooms; doing electrical work; operating elevators; performing crane and hoisting operations; excavating; operating machinery that does woodworking, bakery mixing, cleaning, oiling or punch pressing; roofing; welding; and doing demolition.

Your teen securing a job is a big step on the road to maturity. Be sure to discuss the pros and the cons with him or her. You may also want to agree to a job on a trial basis, such as “you can work x number of hours a week this grading period and then we will decide if you can keep working, based on your grades.” Maintaining good grades, continuing extra curricular activities and keeping a social life will be important to your child’s psychological health and development. Also, prepare a budget with your child, setting limits on spending and enforcing a percentage-of- paycheck-into-savings policy. Good money management skills, acquired when young, will last a lifetime. Part-time jobs can be a wonderful experience, with the right supervision and parental guidance.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

More Jobs Added, But Unemployment Goes Up? Welcome to Our New Reality

The US economy added 213,000 jobs in June, more than the 195,000 expected. Job numbers for May were revised up to 244,000 from 223,00. How is it then that unemployment jumped from 3.8% to 4.0%?

Welcome to the new reality where job gains are undone by an increase in labor force participation. It stood at 62.7% in May and rose to 62.9% in June. That 0.2% increase amounts to 601,000 folks who decided job prospects had improved enough to make it worthwhile.

What is worrisome is that, although we are close to the average labor force participation rate, it has averaged 62.99% since data compilation began in 1950, levels were much higher until recently. Throughout the 90's and up to 2002, the average was closer to 67% and only dipped slightly, to 66%, with the advent of the Great Recession. Since then, however, labor participation steadily dwindled until plateauing below 63% since 2014. If labor participation was ever to normalize, ie get back to pre-Financial Crisis levels, it would mean a jump of 9.6 to 12.6 million new entrants into the job market. At the current job creation rate it would take 4.5 to 6.0 years to assimilate those workers with unemployment rates jumping to 7% in the interim.

So, maybe the job picture is not as rosy as it is currently being painted. Certainly, the wages side of the equation is not that alluring to prospective entrants. Hourly wages only rose 0.2% from the prior month and 2.7% over the year. They rose 0.3% and 0.15% in May and April, respectively, over the previous month and 2.7% and 2.4% over the previous year. If labor markets were tight, as many pundits claim, wage pressures should be much higher. Back in March 2000, for example, when labor participation was around 67% and the unemployment rate stood at 4.1%, average hourly earnings rose 3.6% on a year to year basis. Likewise, in 2008, when the labor participation rate was 66% and unemployment was 4.9%, average hourly earnings rose 3.7%.

While not gangbuster wage growth numbers, however, they should allay the Fed's fears that wage pressures will lead to inflation growth above 2% anytime soon. Nevertheless, the "real" unemployment numbers should give Fed members pause. Maybe the job market and the economy are not as healthy as they surmise and perhaps caution is merited as they consider further rate increases. Instead, the June meeting minutes indicate the Fed considers conditions robust enough to remove accommodative language in their policy statement and that they should continue undaunted in raising the fed funds rate above the neutral level by next year.

About the only concern the Fed had was the flattening of the yield curve. Historically this is a harbinger for recessions, which led to a discussion regarding a recession lurking around the corner and global trade tensions as a potential cause.

Personally, I feel there is some stealthy, nefarious force behind those labor participation and wage numbers. My suspicion is that the demographic forces I have previously written about are at work here. And we should thread carefully on the economy's brake pedal until we can be certain of those forces.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What Jobs Are Safe From Automation?

The road to automation requires robots to collaborate with humans, rather than simply replacing them altogether. Majority of jobs will still require human intervention to some degree.

The risk of job automation is highest in predictable, manual, and repetitive work environments and in industries with lower regulations.

The risk of automation is lower in unstructured, dynamic, and unpredictable work environments and in industries involving high regulatory scrutiny.

U.S. investment bank Goldman Sachs, for example, employed over 600 stock traders at its peak. Thanks to machine-learning algorithms capable of making complex trades, these 600 traders have been reduced to just two. Instead, about one-third of its workforce is now employed as computer engineers.

Amazon, for example, is using 45,000 robots in their warehouses. But at the same time, it is creating thousands of new jobs for humans in its fulfillment centers.

We know that robots are not good at gripping, picking, and handling items in unstructured environments.

Risk of job automation is highest in predictable work environments and in industries with lower regulations. This includes jobs or tasks that are manual and repetitive.

This has happened to manufacturing. It is now impacting over 10.5 million jobs in restaurants, janitorial roles, and warehouses.

In hospitality, the ease of automation is high for repetitive and manual tasks like making coffee or preparing specific dishes. This is particularly true in environments with highly structured processes and menus.

Many startups are working on digital payment and tabletop-ordering software to replace the tasks of cashiers and servers.

Expertise automation and augmentation software (EaaS) is fast replacing entry-level white collar jobs in areas like law (e.g., automatic document analysis and auditing), media (e.g., AI-based news curation and summaries), and even software development.

The good news is that the risk of automation is lower in unstructured or unpredictable work environments. This includes industries involving high regulatory scrutiny.

In healthcare, dynamic decision making in unpredictable work environments makes these patient-facing jobs hard to automate, especially when there is a high degree of emotional intelligence required.

Although trucking is at high risk of automation, this is unlikely to happen widely in the next decade due to regulatory challenges. While technology has the potential to reduce manual labor, it faces regulatory challenges as it still requires a human driver for non-highway driving.

The construction industry, for example, is unstructured and dynamic. It requires human supervision.

Retraining and reskilling employees will be a recurring theme in the future of work. Future-proofing jobs will require constant re-skilling, re-learning, and acquiring of or updated skills and experience so that we can be always future-ready and job-ready and being safe from automation.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What Is HTML? Advantage and Disadvantage of HTML


What is HTML

Hypertext Markup Language, a standardized system for tagging text files to achieve font, colour, graphic, and hyperlink effects on World Wide Web pages.

HTML is the standard markup language for creating Web pages.

HTML stands for Hyper Text Markup Language

HTML describes the structure of Web pages using markup

HTML elements are the building blocks of HTML pages

HTML elements are represented by tags

HTML tags label pieces of content such as “heading”, “paragraph”, “table”, and so on

Browsers do not display the HTML tags, but use them to render the content of the page

Advantages and Disadvantages of HTML

Advantages

Easy to use

Loose syntax (although, being too flexible will not comply with standards)

HTML is easy enough to write

HTML is that it is easy to code.

HTML also allows the use of templates, which makes designing a webpage easy

Very useful for beginners in web designing field.

Supported on almost every browser, if not all browsers.

Widely used; established on almost every website, if not all websites.

Very similar to XML syntax, which is increasingly used for data storage

Free – You need not buy any software

Easy to learn & code even for novice programmers

Disadvantages

It cannot produce dynamic output alone, since it is a static language

Sometimes, the structuring of HTML documents is hard to grasp

Errors can be costly.

The time it takes to choose the color scheme of a page and to create lists, tables and

forms.

It can create only static and plain pages so if we need dynamic pages then HTML is not useful.

Need to write lot of code for making simple webpage.

You have to keep up with deprecated tags, and make sure not to use them Deprecated tags appear because another language that works with HTML has replaced the original work of the tag; thus the other language needs to be learned (most of the time, it is CSS)

Security features offered by HTML are limited.

What is an HTML File?

HTML is a format that tells a computer how to display a web page. The documents themselves are plain text files with special “tags” or codes that a web browser uses to interpret and display information on your computer screen.

HTML stands for Hyper Text Markup Language

An HTML file is a text file containing small markup tags

The markup tags tell the Web browser how to display the page

An HTML file must have an htm or HTML file extension

Example Explained

The declaration defines this document to be HTML

The element is the root element of an HTML page

The element contains meta information about the document

The element specifies a title for the document

The element contains the visible page content

The element defines a large heading

The element defines a paragraph

THANK YOU

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Offshore Oil Rig Jobs

While many of the offshore oil rig jobs are physical in nature, many of the rig companies go out of their way to make sure your time spent onboard is an enjoyable one. For instance employees may find themselves living in accommodation wings that meet 4 or 5 star hotel standards – despite the fact that you a living in the middle of the ocean. While you are on board the company will usually meet all food, board and laundry expenses, along with travel and transfer costs.

There are a large number of offshore oil rig jobs that are available. The range of employment opportunities include:

Driller, Derrickman, Shakerhand or Mudman, Toolpusher, Floormen or Roughnecks, Motorman, Assistant Driller, Crane Operator, Roustabouts, Cleaner/Painter, Storekeeper, Mechanic/Electrician, Sub Sea Engineer, Rig Mechanic, Rig Electrician, Rig Welder, Barge Engineer, Ballast Controlman or Watchstander, Captain and Chief Engineer, Rig Medic and Safety Man.

Most offshore oil rig jobs call for a 14/21 day rotation that means you work for 14 days and have 21 off. This equates to you having approximately 3/5 of the year off on holiday.

In the offshore oil rig industry, there are opportunities for drilling employment and travel to countries such as: Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, the United States, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Mexico, Russia, Norway, China, Canada and the United Kingdom.

Typically salaries for roustabouts and roughnecks (drill deck workers) are approximately US $300 per day. Annual salaries work out to be approximately US $47,000.

More specialized jobs such as that of Driller is likely to make around $56,000 per annum, which Toolpushers, Drill Leaders and Supervisors are likely to earn around the US $75,000 – $100,000 mark per year.

Entry level positions typically make between US $50,000 – US $80,000 per annum. Trades, technical and professional positions will likely earn between US $70,000 – US $220,000 per annum.

Life Offshore

– You will be issued with safety boots hard hat safety glasses and coveralls.

– Keep a good attitude and be focused on why you wanted to work offshore.

– There are smoking rooms at various places on a rig where safety matches will be supplied.

– For meals you take off your work gear and eat in the galley.

– You may have to work a night shift or two as an oil rig is a 24 hour operation.

– Don’t upset the radio operator, medic or chef. Helicopters, medical attention and food are most important.

Aboard an oil rig every piece of lifting equipment has a color code on it – this is an indication that it was tested as safe to use on the last lifting equipment check. Only items with the current color code on them should be used.

When working in the petroleum industry, don’t bring alcohol, illegal drugs, weapons (of any description) including knives, flammable items, lighters and matches (safety matches will be provided in the smokers room) when working on energy jobs.

If working aboard an offshore rig, remove batteries from electrical equipment before checking in you luggage. If you are to be transported by helicopter your mobile phone may be taken from you before you board the helicopter.

A number of people working aboard oil rigs work are in support roles such as catering crew and doctors, etc. The following is an outline of what may be expected for doctors or medics. Because of the physical size of rigs, many of these types of roles are sole charged and one must be able to make do with the facilities and resources at end. In the case of doctors or medics based aboard oil rigs, it may be necessary to treat patients suffering from a huge variety of ailments and illnesses. Issues can arise as a lot of the workers aboard oil rig installations may speak foreign languages, so it is critical for the medical personnel to be able to quickly and effectively diagnose the problem. Generally medical staff will work one of two shifts, either day or night. Their role can often also include checking and maintaining stocks of emergency supplies, testing and verifying drinking water supplies are clean, as well as inspecting both raw and cooked foods from the kitchen. They are also often responsible for conducting weekly first aid seminars for all workers aboard the oil rig.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Fear Is Okay, Complacency Kills Jobs

The collision of demographic changes, the rapid spread of automation and rising income inequality will have the potential to trigger an unparalleled major economic and employment disruption far greater than we have ever experienced. Understanding and planning for these inevitable disruptions will be vital when future-proofing jobs.

In fact, there’s a total of 62 challenges workers are facing in their workplaces.

People don’t plan to fail. They just fail to plan and future proof themselves for the inevitable.

While fear is a normal human emotion and may paralyze us from taking action, it’s complacency that will ultimately kill them and their jobs.

We, therefore, have to constantly pay attention to what’s going on around us. We have to be vigilant, flexible and adapting to landscapes that are constantly changing and shifting.

Fear mongering sells

Every day, we read about robots taking over our jobs.

“Will robots take my job?”

“The robots are coming for your jobs.”

“Robots will steal your job.”

“Robots are the ultimate job stealers.”

We also come across findings from Gallop which found that in the U.S.:

  1. 58% say new technology is the greater threat to jobs.

  2. 23% worry that they may lose their jobs to technology.

  3. 76% say artificial intelligence will change the way people work and live.

  4. 73% say artificial intelligence adoption will result in net job loss.

Just like there is no one property market in any one country, there’s also not one single conclusion that we can derive from the threat of automation, technology, and artificial intelligence.

It should be noted that predictions of widespread job destruction could be overstated by many especially when we take demographics, economics, income inequality and job creation into account.

There are limiting factors to automation

Let’s be clear.

Each country, each geographical location, and each job market and industry is very different. Demographics are different. Economic growth is different. Organizations are very different.

To say that robots will be taking over our jobs is not that true, yet.

(For the purposes of this article, I have used the term “automation” to include robotics, artificial intelligence, and all things technology.)

There is a cost involved in deploying technologies. Organizations need to be able to quantify and justify the benefits over the cost of investing in any technological solutions. While it is easy to say that automation will take over our jobs, the cost of doing so may be too prohibitive for some organizations.

Depending on the country and geographical location, organizations may not be able to justify the huge monetary investment in technologies, yet. ‘Cheap’ labor may be in abundance. Access to capital and technology may be difficult. Access to people skills to deploy and maintain new technologies may not be present.

McKinsey has said that automation will not happen overnight. For them, there are five key factors that will influence the pace and extent of its adoption:

  1. The technology must be feasible and it is invented, integrated and adapted into solutions that can automate specific activities.

  2. The cost of developing and deploying solutions must not be prohibitive.

  3. Labor market dynamics including the supply and demand and the costs of human labor can present an alternative to automation.

  4. Whether these new technologies have tangible economic benefits that could be translated into higher throughput, increased quality, and labor cost savings.

  5. Whether the technology has regulatory and social acceptance that makes business sense.

McKinsey also noted that while the impact of automation might be slower at the macro level within entire sectors or economies, they could be faster at a micro level.

This is where an individual worker’s activities could be automated quickly. Or organizations may use automation to overcome possible disruption caused by their competitors.

In short, there are certain limiting factors that may prevent automation from being deployed in mass and ultimately take over our jobs.

Job losses due to automation are inevitable

Whether we like it or not, we know that automation is here to stay. It’s inevitable. It’s a question of degree or level of impact.

How automation impact each one of us will depend on our unique circumstances in the country we live in and how well prepared are we.

Humans have embraced automation since creation. We have been transformed by automation; from agriculture to an industrial age, from industrial to information age, and from information to services.

In fact, we cannot get enough of the latest gadgets, latest iPhone, latest TVs, etc. We constantly fill our lives with the latest technologies.

With Apple’s Home pod, Amazon’s Echo (Alexa) and Google’s Home, voice technology is only going to grow. Kids today can simply command Alexa or Apple’s Siri to answer various questions.

It’s no surprise that we will always be embracing technological advances and inviting them into our lives.

So, what’s different in our work lives?

Don’t be surprised that automation will penetrate our work lives even more and will fully transform or recreate the work we do.

We know that there’s always the danger of automation on jobs.

Here’s the good news. History shows that new technologies have always increased the number of jobs.

And the bad news. Technology always hurts as recognizable jobs are destroyed and new ones are created. Some jobs are yet to be conceived. It’s a question of when not if.

McKinsey estimated that 375 million people globally will need to be retrained to learn entirely new occupations. It means that people in mid-careers with children, mortgages, families, and financial obligations, will need retraining.

This retraining is not going to be measured in years. It’s not going to be feasible for many of these people to go back to universities for two-year degrees.

The challenge is to retrain people in mid-careers on a large scale and help them learn new skills to match employable jobs in growing occupations in places where they live.

Opportunities are plentiful

As they say, with every danger, there will always be opportunities.

There are opportunities to future-proof ourselves now from the potential impact of automation. It does take several years for automation to fully replace our jobs, but it is the time now to take action and prepare ourselves for the inevitable technological disruptions and transformation that automation will bring into our workplaces.

We know that automation will ultimately replace our jobs. Paying attention to this trend will help us prepare ourselves to adapt and change for the future.

By taking proactive action now, we can future-proof ourselves, our jobs and our income sources from the likely negative effects of automation. We are able to overcome our fears and eliminate anxieties propagated by fear mongering.

Let’s stop worrying about the future and take action now.

Pay attention to what’s going on around us.

How do we future-proof jobs and prepare ourselves?

Just two words: “Interaction” and “technical”.

It boils down to focusing or equipping ourselves with higher human interaction and technical skills.

Let me elaborate.

There are two parts to any automation rollout.

Firstly, we have the hardware itself. We need the right engineering and design skills to develop, produce and deploy the hardware required for automation to take place.

Secondly, we need highly technical skills and subject matter expertise to research and program the “brains” behind the hardware to achieve the outcomes we want.

At its height back in 2000, Goldman Sachs employed 600 traders buying and selling stock on the orders of its clients. In 2017, there are just two equity traders left. Automated trading programs have substantially taken over the rest of the work supported by 200 computer engineers.

McDonald’s new tech initiatives are pushing employees to continuously perform more tasks without any change in pay. The push for more tech-infused ordering avenues like mobile apps, delivery, and self-order kiosks is making it harder for workers.

The company saw a 50% increase in revenue earned per employee. Numbers like that could make McDonald’s more likely to adopt more technological solutions, even if they take a bit of adjustment for the workers.

Without a doubt, computer programming will become a core skill requirement for many well-paying jobs. This will lead to further inequality in pay between the haves and the haves not.

Coding skills will be in demand across a broad range of careers. The ability not only to use but also to program software and develop applications is often required of business people who create websites, build products and technologies, and conduct research.

It’s only through the learning and application of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) that we will be enabled to effectively develop, program, and deploy machines.

STEM education should be the pre-requisite for future-proofing jobs.

When we rely on automation to help us work better and as we outsource our work to machines, we will free ourselves to do the work that requires higher level skills. It’s about moving from physical labor to brain power thinking, creativity and analysis. It’s about developing higher value skills relevant for automation and transformation.

When we rely on automation to replace labor, we need more human interaction in its place to bring about the required changes. Teamwork and collaboration of people across the world will become ever more important. We need to find the right global technical skills to help us solve problems and manage change.

We will rely on our human interaction skills to get things done, to collaborate on technical projects, to make decisions, and to find solutions to problems through crowd-sourcing methods.

This means that we require higher interaction skills for person-to-person, team-to-team communication. These high touch skills will become so important in the future.

In essence, the future of work is about human interaction and technical skills.

When we cannot add value to the design and implementation of machines or cannot harness the potential of people to perform at their peak alongside machines, then we should naturally worry about automation taking over our jobs.

When we know that the future of work is fundamentally about higher human interaction and technical skills, we should be focusing on gaining these skills now rather than waiting for things to happen.

Complacency will kill jobs

We have been graciously given the knowledge about what the future looks like on a silver platter.

“Will robots take my job?”

The answer depends.

When we are complacent and do not adapt ourselves to the inevitable changes impacting our jobs and environment, then robots will certainly take away our jobs and income.

When we fail to anticipate the future and minimize the effects of shocks and stresses of future events like automation on our jobs, incomes and income streams, we are really setting ourselves up for failure.

Complacency will kill our jobs and incomes.

Ask this question: Do we have the right human interaction and technical skills to survive the onslaught of automation on our jobs and to remain employable into the future?

The key to our survival in the future is constant retraining or reskilling. We cannot hold on to our past training and education to save us from losing our jobs to automation.

The reality is that the half-life of skills is about five years. This means that in five years’ time, half of our current skills will become obsolete. In ten years’ time, without any retraining, we will become totally obsolete.

Complacency will ultimately kill our existence. Don’t let it be you.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Happiest Jobs for Baby Boomers Looking to Change Careers

Are you singing "I can't get no satisfaction" when it comes to your job? Do you find yourself daydreaming about a career change? Do you feel bored, dissatisfied, or exhausted? Do you have the career burnout blues? Or have you recently lost your job or retired and want to keep working but yearn to change directions?

You're not alone. Many baby boomers feel the same way. A career change can be scary. Maybe financial worries, a fear of failure, or a less than enthusiastic spouse has prevented you from leaving your comfort zone thus far. But, keep in mind, the biggest rewards come from taking the biggest risks, says life coach Caroline Adams Miller, author of Creating Your Best Life. "Otherwise, you may be filled with regret at the end of your life-and that prospect helps put steel in your spine," she says.

Studies show that up to 80 percent of baby boomers plan to do some sort of paid work until age 70 to stay mentally sharp, keep engaged socially, and achieve financial security in retirement. That leaves a couple of decades after 50 to work. Perhaps that's why more and more boomers are contemplating an "encore career" to pursue their passions and create a fulfilling life they can enjoy.

But is it really possible? Certainly!

The American Institute for Economic Research looked at people who changed or tried to change jobs after age 45 and found that 82% of people aged 47 and older who took up new careers in the last two years were successful, with half of them making more money .

"Don't view your age or your experience as a liability. It's a benefit to companies to have a multi-generational workforce," says Oriana Vogel, vice president of global talent acquisition at American Express. "One of our goals … is to hire employees that can provide a variety of different perspectives and experiences." Age doesn't come into consideration when it comes down to hiring the best people, she says.

A report from the Bankers Life Center for a Secure Retirement found that "boomers are just as likely or more likely to be engaged in their work than are the younger Generation X or Millennial generations."

So, yes, it's possible to find a different career you love after the age of 50. But which job will make you the happiest? To help you decide and perhaps narrow your choices, I did a bit of research on America's happiest and unhappiest jobs:

THE HAPPIEST JOBS

Kununu created a "Career Happiness Index," looking at nearly 200,000 employee reviews from 2016 to name three of the nation's happiest industries of 2016.

Public administration topped the list, perhaps because government employees enjoy great benefits, hours, vacation policies, job stability, and support from management. In addition, employees felt that they were working for the common good, serving the public, the study noted.

Consulting is a booming industry with a projected growth rate of 18%. Workers found their work challenging and enjoyed working with others.

Interestingly to me, since I work as a writer, the arts and entertainment industry made the top three. Creative pursuits may not make you rich but could help you be happier.

In another study, CareerBliss created a ranking of the Happiest and Unhappiest Jobs in 2016 and listed recruiters as the happiest employees. "Finding great jobs for other people creates a happy work environment for recruiters … many recruiters find joy in helping others find jobs and earning bonuses for doing so, "said CareerBliss CEO Heidi Golledge.

A USA Today article listed jobs involving caring for, teaching, and protecting others as well as creative pursuits as the most satisfying.

Research published by NORC at the University of Chicago listed the top five positions for job satisfaction, in ascending order, clergy, physical therapists, firefighters, educational administrators, and artists.

THE UNHAPPIEST JOBS

You may want to steer clear of the jobs that don't have people jumping for joy. What careers seem to make people grumpy and miserable?

According to Kununu's data, professionals in healthcare / pharmaceutical, legal advice and real estate / facility management scored the lowest for happiness.

CareerBliss listed sales account manager as Unhappiest Job. Rounding out the bottom five are security officer, merchandiser, cashier, and driver.

TIPS FOR CHOOSING A NEW CAREER

A word of caution. Remember, an encore career that brings you happiness isn't all about pursuing your passions. As the research above proves, when considering your choices, don't forget to consider practical work issues such as job security, pay, benefits, work-life balance, and office environment.

For example, just because you love a hobby does mean you'll enjoy it once you add the stress of making a living. Take it from me, I chose to write professionally – and no regrets – but it was near as fun and carefree as when writing was something I did for my own pleasure.

CONSIDER STARTING YOUR OWN BUSINESS

Another option? Many boomers approaching retirement are choosing to become entrepreneurs and starting their own businesses. They want to continue working – but on their own terms.

In fact, a new Gallop study showed adults over the age of 50 are one of the fastest-growing groups of entrepreneurs in the US An overwhelming majority – 83% – say their main reason for launching a venture was a lifestyle choice or to increase their income. This poll suggests that boomers are searching for independence, a flexible schedule that leaves room for volunteering and traveling. And they want to pursue their interests and passions before it's too late.

Keep your mind open and be creative. Consider wearing more than one hat and find a customized solution that puts you in control of your life. For example, you could combine writing, public speaking, teaching, and consulting. The Internet has opened up new freelancing opportunities.

The good news? Despite the hard work and dedication required to start and run a small business, 94 percent of US entrepreneurs are happy being small business owners, according to a new survey by the online small business community, Manta.

POSSIBLE PITFALLS

Don't rush into any decisions or immediately quit your job. Prepare and take it one step at a time.

Depending on your financial situation, "you might have to do it [a career change] incrementally," says Kerry Hannon, author of Great Jobs for Everyone 50-Plus. "You need a job that pays the bills now. Then, on the side, take the classes you need, build those skills you need," she suggests.

Do the necessary research. Learn about the new career you're interested in, including pay, job satisfaction, and trends in the industry as well as the skills, qualifications, certifications, and credentials you'll need. Strategically network with people in the field. Keep your skills up-to-date and utilize LinkedIn and other social media sites.

Internships and volunteer work can help you gain hands-on experience and test-drive a new career path before quitting a job.

Keep these tips in mind and you can move forward with confidence to reinvent your life and start that new career!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment